Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Taylor and Francis explain Open Access



Published on Dec 10, 2013

An introduction to Open Access publishing from Taylor & Francis Group, this is a short video posted to youtube: 

Watch it here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GTA3YxI2_E&feature=youtube_gdata


Posted by K. Jane

Open Access is not as difficult as you might think

Georgia State University Professor Carrie Freeman

Georgia State University Professor Carrie Freeman describes how making scholarship open access isn't as difficult as most academics might think. 

She posts abstracts on academic.edu.

Watch the video at: http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/gsu_images/23/

~ Posted by K. Jane

Are alternative metrics for you?

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) has announced the publication of Altmetrics in Context. 

"As scholarly communication takes on new forms and moves increasingly to digital and open access venues, the value of new types of metrics is increasingly important for the research community. It is causing discussion and, in some camps, heated debate."

Altmetrics report the impact of a wide range of research outputs, including data sets, articles and code. This document, available on the CARL Website, provides a quick introduction to this new field of research impact assessment and encourages researchers to use altmetrics in their work.

* Read Altmetrics in Context here (http://carl-abrc.us6.list-manage.com/track/click?u=9000187600&id=6c9a9e11e1&e=03b5106296)

~~~
posted by 
K. Jane

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Repositories are important scholarly resources!

Georgia State University Professor Dennis Young
Georgia State University Professor Dennis Young
Georgia State University Professor Dennis Young tells how open access institutional repositories are important scholarly resources which add to a university's academic reputation.

Watch him at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGN0QsAgX_U&feature=youtube_gdata



Have you deposited any of your articles to the Atrium?

Go to: http://atrium.lib.uoguelph.ca


Posted by

K.Jane

Thursday, December 5, 2013

The value of open access to theses and dissertations

Gail P. ClementScholarly Communications Librarian & Associate Professor at Texas A&M University, shared two new papers about the value of open access to electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs). They are an essential component of effective graduate education. In her words, "Written entirely independently, these two works in combination articulate the power and promise of the ETD experience as an opportunity to empower the newest generation of scholars to make meaningful and impactful contributions to their disciplines and to society".
A summary of these articles, with links to each, may be found online
via the Free US Etds blog at http://bit.ly/1bEuyiS


Another good read:

~
Posted by K. Jane

Monday, December 2, 2013

Tools for early researchers from Elsevier. worth a look

Elsevier has developed tools for early researchers.
  • Developing a successful career in research and publishing requires a broad skill set so we've created a new center on Elsevier.com, Early Career Resources, especially with the early career researcher in mind. Available for your use is an extensive collection of information, videos, guides, recommended reading and more.
  • Understanding the ethical boundaries in scientific research and publishing is a key step in making sure an author's work gets off to the right start. Elsevier's ethics website contains a downloadable toolkit, videos and webcasts covering topics from plagiarism to research misconduct.
  • Free bite-sized online training webcasts from PublishingConnect have useful tips and tricks on a range of valuable topics, for example: 'How to get published', 'Getting your paper noticed', and "The Impact Factor and Other Bibliometric Indicators".
  • To keep up to date with further resources and author related services, subscribe to their Authors' Update. This free quarterly newsletter is jam-packed with relevant information and useful tools for scholars.

~
Posted by K. Jane

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Stevan Harnad says:

Stevan Harnad, a leader in the open access movement, posted the following comment on a JISC mailing list this morning:
 
 
 
Physicists have been spontaneously self-archiving in Arxiv since 1991, but most other disciplines have not followed suit, despite the demonstrated benefits of providing open access in terms of research uptake, usage and impact. 

It is for this reason that research funders and institutions worldwide are (at last) beginning to mandate (i.e., require) that their fundees and faculty self-archive. 

For open access mandates to work, however, it has to be possible to systematically monitor and verify compliance

Not all research is funded (and there are many different research funders); but virtually all research comes from institutions (universities and research institutes), most of which now have institutional repositories for their researchers to self-archive in. 

Institutions are hence the natural (and eager) partners best placed to fulfill the all-important role of monitoring and ensuring compliance with the requirements of their own researchers' grant requirements, via their own institutional repositories. (This also gives institutions the incentive to adopt open access self-archiving mandates of their own, for all their research output, funded and unfunded, in all disciplines.) 

Researchers, in turn, should only need to deposit their articles once, institutionally -- not willy-nilly, and multiply, in diverse institution-external repositories.

The solution is simple, since all open access repositories are interoperable, meaning they share the same core metadata-tagging system, and hence each institution's repository software can automatically export its metadata to any other institution-external repository desired. 

That way researchers need only deposit once, in their own institutional repository; institutional and funder open access mandates areconvergent and cooperative rather than divergent and competitive; and mandate compliance can be reliably and systematically ensured by the author's institution.

So Biorxiv is a welcome addition to the growing list of disciplinary repositories for centralized search and retrieval, but deposit in Biorxiv should not be direct: researchers should export to it from their institutional repositories. (Biorxiv can also harvest from institutional repositories, just as Google and Google Scholar do.)

Biologists and biomedical scientists, unlike physicists, do not have a culture of spontaneous self-archiving. Hence open access mandates from funders and institutions are needed if there is to be open access to their research. And those mandates have to be readily complied with; and compliance has to be readily verifiable.

So let us not lose another quarter century hoping that biologists will at last do, of their own accord, what Arxiv users have already been doing, unmandated, since 1991. In 1994 there was already a "Subversive Proposal" -- unheeded -- that all disciplines should do as the Arxivers had done. Harold Varmus made a similar proposal ("e-biomed") in 1999, likewise unheeded.

Let us start getting it right in 2013, the year that funders in the US, EU and UK have begun concertedly mandating open access, along with a growing number of institutions worldwide. But let us harmonize the mandates, to ensure that they work: 

Arxiv has certainly earned the right to remain the sole exception, insofar as direct deposit is concerned, being the only institution-external repository in which authors have already been faithfully self-archiving, unmandated, for almost a quarter century: 

For Arxiv, institutional repositories can import instead of export. But for the rest: Deposit institutionally, export centrally.

Monday, November 11, 2013

Good Practices for University Open-Access Policies

Good Practices for University Open-Access Policies

Published October 22, 2013

byPeter Suber, Stuart Shieber

This is a guide to good practices for university open-access (OA) policies. It’s based on the type of policy adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, U of Kansas, U of Oregon, Trinity, Oberlin, Rollins, Wake Forest, Duke, U of Puerto Rico, Hawaii - Manoa, Columbia, Strathmore, Emory, Princeton, Jomo Kenyatta, Utah State, Bifröst, Miami, California - San Francisco, the U Massachusetts Medical School, Rutgers, Georgia Tech, McGill University Librarians,  and many other institutions. (See p. 66).  Recommendations should be useful to universities taking these and other approaches.

This is an excellent guide representing one version in a constantly evolving and growing compilation of recommendations exploring best practices for open access in the university setting.

The guide is endorsed by these projects and organizations:
  • Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI) 
  • Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) 
  • Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL)
  • Enabling Open Scholarship (EOS)
  • Harvard Open Access Project (HOAP) 
  • Mediterranean Open Access Network (MedOANet)
  • Open Access Directory (OAD) 
  • Open Access Implementation Group (OAIG)
  • Open Access Scholarly Information Sourcebook(OASIS) 
  • Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
  • SPARC Europe

The site includes access to the first print and PDF editions. The new editions use the text as it stood in late September 2013.

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/node/8603

Given the Tri-Council plans for mandated Open Access to funded research, I hope to see our Canadian institutions use the guide to develop their own policies.

~~~~~~~~~~ Posted by K. Jane

Monday, November 4, 2013

ACS Publications expand its open access publishing options

4 Components of ACS OA expansion


ACS Publications announced a far-reaching expansion of its open access publishing options—including a major new open access journal, more licensing choices for authors, and a stimulus program to support authors who select ACS journals when seeking to publish their work open access.

1. ACS Central Science—ACS’s first pure open-access, peer-reviewed journal will be launched in 2014.

2. ACS Editors’ Choice—One article published in a subscription-based ACS journal will be made openly accessible every day beginning on Jan. 1, 2014.

3. ACS Author Rewards—Corresponding authors of articles published in ACS journals in 2014 will get a $1,500 credit per article, which can be used to pay for open-access fees starting in 2015 and until 2017.

4. ACS AuthorChoice—Existing program will be expanded for new features, including more licensing options.

Visit the website www.acsopenaccess.org for a full overview of the new offerings.


~~~ posted by K. Jane

Thunder Clap! and fight for Open Access to Research

OA Button

Do you believe Open Access is the way forward? Dedicate a moment of your time to push for it.


"Paywalls hide knowledge and stifle innovation, help map their impact and get the research you need. #oabuttonlaunch http://thndr.it/18sBpJ0”     

The open access button is a browser-based tool that tracks how many people are denied access to academic research, where they are in the world, their profession and why they were looking for the research to create a real-time interactive map of the issue.

Sign the Thunderclap


~~~ Posted by K. Jane

Thursday, October 31, 2013

All about the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy

Exciting news: The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) are developing a harmonized policy on access to research publications.


As of January 1, 2008, all CIHR funded researchers have been required to make their peer-reviewed publications accessible at no cost within 12 months of publication.

As of September 1, 2014, all SSHRC and NSERC researchers will also be required to make their peer-reviewed publications accessible at no cost within 12 months of publication.
Adherence to the policy would be achieved by submitting peer-reviewed journal publications:
• To a journal that offers Open Access to articles on it website, either immediately or within 12 months OR
• To a central or institutional repository, where it will be made freely available within 12 months of publication.

Costs associated with publishing in online open access journals will be considered as eligible grant expenses by the Agencies. Many journals allow authors to deposit their post-review copy of the publication within an institutional or disciplinary repository within 12 months at no cost.

Principal investigators for each grant will be responsible for compliance with the policy.

NSERC and SSHRC have invited institutions, associations, organizations and individuals to provide input on the draft Tri-Agency Open Access Policy.

Institutional and organizational representatives are asked to consult their researchers and membership and report on the collective perspective. Individuals may also respond independently.

The draft policy is accessible until December 13, at which time the consultation period ends.

Responses should be sent electronically to openaccess@nserc-crsng.gc.ca. http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/NSERC-CRSNG/policies-politiques/OpenAccess-LibreAcces_eng.asp


~~~~~~ Posted by K. Jane

Open Data: Unlocking Innovation and Performance


The McKinsey & Co. Global Institute has released an interesting report titled "Open Data: Unlocking Innovation and Performance" which covers the potential of opening up data (particularly government data) across a number of sectors, including education. Pointers to the executive summary and the full report, plus some related audio materials, can be found at

http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/business_technology/open_data_unlocking_innovation_and_performance_with_liquid_information

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

SAGE Research Methods

Do you know which method you want to use to answer your research question?

Start out by doing a Quick Search on this method from the box in the upper left of every page. Use the Advanced Search feature for creating a more targeted query.  Search results will include relevant books, book chapters, dictionary and encyclopedia entries, videos, or journal articles from over 175,000 pages of renowned SAGE content in research methods.

Not sure which method to use in your research?

Start by exploring the Methods Map. You can use the Methods Map to discover new methods or discover relationships between methods, and then link to related

Watch these three videos:

How can an undergrad use SAGE Research Methods?


~~~ Posted by K. Jane

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

All about Peer Review


Peer review: the nuts and bolts cover image

Are you in the early stages of your career as a researcher? Do you sometimes wonder what happens from the point that you submit a journal article to the time that you hear it has been accepted? Here are two resources that might interest you:

Peer review: the nuts and bolts

This is a nuts and bolts guide to peer review for early career researchers written by members of the VoYS network.
- See more at: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html#sthash.7RrIRCFu.dpuf



Peer Review: the Nuts and Bolts is a guide to peer review written specifically for early career researchers. Written by members of the Voice of Young Science (VoYS)  the guide will help researchers understand:
  1. How the peer review process works
  2. Some of the limitations of peer review
  3. The role of peer review in society
Another tool worth watching is a youtube video that was streamed live on May 31, 2013.
 

Peer Review: The Nuts & Bolts was a
Sense About Science workshop that was recorded live at SAGE (http://www.sagepub.com/home.nav) in London 31st May 2013.

Speakers included
Dr Stephen Curry, Professor of Structural Biology, Imperial College London

Dr Sarah Edwards, co-editor of the journal Research Ethics

Irene Hames, COPE (Committee on Publication Ethics) Council, and independent editorial consultant and adviser to the publishing, higher education and research sectors

Julia Wilson, development manager for Sense About Science.

Book: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yglKbJiHfKM


~posted by K.Jane

Peer review: the nuts and bolts

This is a nuts and bolts guide to peer review for early career researchers written by members of the VoYS network.
Peer review: the nuts and boltsUsing a collection of concerns raised by their peers, the VoYS writing team set off to interview scientists, journal editors, grant bodies’ representatives, patient group workers and journalists in the UK and around the world to find out how peer review works, the challenges for peer review and how to get involved.
We have not avoided criticisms of the peer review process in this guide but rather entered into the debate, asking journal editors and reviewers some challenging questions about scientific fraud and plagiarism going undetected; issues of trust and bias; ground-breaking research taking years to publish and the system benefiting a closed group of scientists.
This guide will help early career researchers understand:
1. How the peer review process works
2. Some of the limitations of peer review
3. The role of peer review in society
- See more at: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html#sthash.7RrIRCFu.dpuf
This is a nuts and bolts guide to peer review for early career researchers written by members of the VoYS network - See more at: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html#sthash.7RrIRCFu.dpuf

Peer review: the nuts and bolts

This is a nuts and bolts guide to peer review for early career researchers written by members of the VoYS network.
- See more at: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html#sthash.7RrIRCFu.dpuf

Peer review: the nuts and bolts

This is a nuts and bolts guide to peer review for early career researchers written by members of the VoYS network.
- See more at: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html#sthash.7RrIRCFu.dpuf

Peer review: the nuts and bolts

This is a nuts and bolts guide to peer review for early career researchers written by members of the VoYS network.
Peer review: the nuts and boltsUsing a collection of concerns raised by their peers, the VoYS writing team set off to interview scientists, journal editors, grant bodies’ representatives, patient group workers and journalists in the UK and around the world to find out how peer review works, the challenges for peer review and how to get involved.
We have not avoided criticisms of the peer review process in this guide but rather entered into the debate, asking journal editors and reviewers some challenging questions about scientific fraud and plagiarism going undetected; issues of trust and bias; ground-breaking research taking years to publish and the system benefiting a closed group of scientists.
This guide will help early career researchers understand:
1. How the peer review process works
2. Some of the limitations of peer review
3. The role of peer review in society
Peer review: the nuts and bolts was launched in July 2012 at the EuroScience Open Forum in Dublin alongside a call from VoYS members to the Higher Education Funding Council of England to recognise reviewing as part of the Research Excellence Framework.
- See more at: http://www.senseaboutscience.org/pages/peer-review-the-nuts-and-bolts.html#sthash.H0VAQmW7.dpuf

Friday, August 2, 2013

University of California Faculty Senate Passes Open Access Policy

screenshot of UC announcementThe University of California joined an exclusive list of 177 other institutions worldwide when their Faculty Senate approved and  adopted an Open Access Policy.

http://senate.universityofcalifornia.edu/
http://osc.universityofcalifornia.edu/openaccesspolicy/


See a list of other institutional mandates at ROARMAP

Should Guelph follow suit?

~
Posted  by K. jane

Thursday, August 1, 2013

A special themed issue on Altmetrics in summer issue of Information Standards Quarterly (ISQ)

Interested in altmetrics?

Don't miss the latest issue of Information Standards Quarterly (ISQ)
Summer 2013 Volume 25, no. 2

This special issue focusses on Altmetrics

Go to the website: doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3789/isqv25no2.2013

or download the PDF of the full issue. (18.5 MB)


 

 posted by K. Jane

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Open Access: Why faculty should care

screencapture of vimeo
The CDL was founded by the University of California in 1997 to take advantage of emerging technologies that were transforming the way digital information was being published and accessed. Since then, in collaboration with the UC libraries and other partners, we assembled one of the world’s largest digital research libraries and changed the ways that faculty, students, and researchers discover and access information.

This is an excellent short video from their collection. Rich Schneider, UCSF professor of orthopaedic surgery and open access champion, was instrumental in rallying UCSF faculty to pass an open access policy in May 2012 (2:08 minutes):

Watch it: http://vimeo.com/51711687

and see other videos from Rich Schneider: http://www.escholarship.org/about_meet_schneider.html#2

Monday, July 22, 2013

Honoring Creators of The Declaration On Research Assessment With SPARC Innovator Award

SPARC Honors Creators of The Declaration On Research Assessment With SPARC Innovator Award
 
Washington, D.C. – July 22, 2013

Evaluating good research and recognizing accomplished researchers is an important component of science, but, critics claim that there has been too much emphasis placed on using the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a proxy to assess impact.

The JIF is a quick and easy way to assess the average number of citations in a journal. However, many in the scientific community feel that it has been applied inappropriately to measure articles and individual researchers, and has come to dominate publishing decisions and academic personnel matters in a way that skews scientific judgments.

Taking a strong first step on the road reversing this trend, in May of this year, 237 individuals and institutions signed the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), which calls for an improvement in the way the output of scientific research is evaluated.

The declaration poses a simple but bold proposition: that journal-based metrics should not be used as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist’s contributions, or in making hiring, promotion or funding decisions.

Since it was issued, the statement has resonated in diverse corners of the scientific community and more than 8,700 individuals and 340 organizations have pledged their support to the campaign by signing the online declaration.

Among those leading the DORA efforts:
  • David Drubin, editor-in-chief of The American Society for Cell Biology’s journal, Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC), and professor of cell and developmental biology at the University of California at Berkeley;
  • Stefano Bertuzzi, executive director of the ASCB;
  • Bernd Pulverer, head of scientific publications for the European Molecular Biology Organization;
  • Mark Patterson, Executive Director of eLife in Cambridge, England; and
  • Mike Rossner, former executive director of The Rockefeller University Press

For their work in trying to change the broad use of the Journal Impact Factor as the sole measure used to assess research and researchers, SPARC recognizes the creators of DORA with its July 2013 Innovator Award.

While reliance on journal metrics has been a community concern for some time, the DORA organizers said the issue came to a head as funding for research has stagnated in many countries and competition has intensified to get into prestigious journals. They contend the current system of evaluation is embedded but there is a general view that reliance on metrics has gone too far. The movement started within cell biologists, but the supporters now include social scientists, mathematicians, and chemists from both the U.S. and around the world.

The July 2013 SPARC Innovator Profile is online at www.sparc.arl.org/initiatives/innovator.
 
The SPARC Innovator program recognizes advances in scholarly communication propelled by an individual, institution, or group
 
Further information and lists of previous SPARC Innovators, can be found on the SPARC Web site at www.sparc.arl.org.

~
Re- posted by K. Jane

Scientific data: open access to research results will boost Europe's innovation capacity

European Commission logo
European Commission Logo
On July 17th the Council of the European Union published its press release on the Agreement on Horizon 2020.
 
The agreement paves the way for the formal adoption of the "Horizon 2020" legislative package by the European Parliament and the Council through a vote in the coming months. Horizon 2020 will replace the EU's 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7), which runs until the end of 2013. Compared with FP7, the new programme is expected to further eliminate fragmentation in the fields of scientific research and innovation.
 
Read the full text of the press release here:
 

HORIZON 2020 will include a section about Open access and open data to results:
Read the details about data and open access here:
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_IP-12-790_en.htm

~
Posted by K. Jane
page4image1000

Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?

Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities
Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities? Findings from a 2011 Survey of Academic Publishers College & Research Libraries - vol. 74 no. 4, July 2013


An increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide are requiring submission of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) by graduate students and are subsequently providing open access to these works in online repositories. Faculty advisors and graduate students are concerned that such unfettered access to their work could diminish future publishing opportunities. This study investigated social sciences, arts, and humanities journal editors’ and university press directors’ attitudes toward ETDs. The findings indicate that manuscripts that are revisions of openly accessible ETDs are always welcome for submission or considered on a case-by-case basis by 82.8 percent of journal editors and 53.7 percent of university press directors polled.

Read on



~
Posted by K. Jane

An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists



An Introduction to Social Media for Scientists - an open access article

PLoS Biology - April 23

Online social media tools can be some of the most rewarding and informative resources for scientists — if they know how to use them.


 Read more













~posted by K. Jane

Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors

Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors
Guide to Creative Commons for Humanities and Social Science Monograph Authors
OAPEN-UK - July 2013

Print sales of scholarly monographs are in decline.

This guide explores concerns expressed in public evidence given by researchers, learned societies and publishers to inquiries in the House of Commons and the House of Lords, and also concerns expressed by researchers working with the OAPEN-UK project. This guide is specifically about Creative Commons licences, not about open access in general.


Read more










~
posted by
K. Jane

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

British Academy "Debating Open Access" Essays Available

"debating open access" image of the  book cover
The British Academy has published a series of eight essays dealing with open access primarily in the humanities and social sciences.

Featuring contributions from:
Rita Gardner
Stuart M. Shieber
Chris Wickham
Stephen Curry
Martin Paul Eve
Ziyad Marar
Robin Osborne
Nigel Vincent


These are available for download at:

http://www.britac.ac.uk/openaccess/debatingopenaccess.cfm


Thanks to Clifford Lynch, Director, CNI for sharing.

~posted by K. Jane

Monday, June 24, 2013

Measuring Scholarly Impact: The Influence of 'Altmetrics'

Columbia university scholarly communication program logo
"Measuring Scholarly Impact: The Influence of 'Altmetrics' on a Changing Conversation" is part of the Research Without Borders speaker series at Columbia University.

"Altmetrics" refers to methods of measuring scholarly impact using Web-based social media. Why does it matter? In many academic fields, attaining scholarly prestige means publishing research articles in important scholarly journals. However, many in the academic community consider a journal's prestige, which is determined by a metric calculated using the number of citations to the journal, to be a poor proxy for the quality of the individual author's work. At the same time, hiring and promotion committees are looking for ways to determine the impact of alternate formats now commonly used by researchers such as blogs, data sets, videos, and social media.

The panelists all work with innovative new tools for assessing scholarly impact:

Jason Priem, Co-Founder, ImpactStory
Kristi Holmes, Bioinformaticist, Bernard Becker Medical Library, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine
Caitlin Aptowicz Trasande, Head of Science Metrics, Digital Science

Visit the Scholarly Communication Program website for information on past and upcoming Research Without Borders events: http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/

Date: November 13, 2012

Sponsors: Scholarly Communication Program
       

Watch it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bygwrPhd0DQ

~
posted by
K jane

Monday, June 17, 2013

San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment

The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA),  logo
DORA logo
The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), initiated by the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) together with a group of editors and publishers of scholarly journals, recognizes the need to improve the ways in which the outputs of scientific research are evaluated.

The signatories support the adoption of a number of practices in research assessment including the following General Recommendation:

1. Do not use journal-based metrics, such as Journal Impact Factors, as a surrogate measure of the quality of individual research articles, to assess an individual scientist's contributions, or in hiring, promotion, or funding decisions.

The full document may be read at:   http://am.ascb.org/dora/


~
Posted by K. Jane

Friday, June 14, 2013

G8 Science Ministers Statement on Open Scientific Research Data

On June 13, 2013, the G8 Science Ministers released a statement outlining the need for open scientific research data, the need to promote the development of global research infrastructure and recognition of the need to expand access to scientific research results.

In part the statement says "We are committed to openness in scientific research data to speed up the progress of scientific discovery, create innovation, ensure that the results of scientific research are as widely available as practical, enable transparency in science and engage the public in the scientific process. We have decided to support the set of principles for open scientific research data ...."

See the full statement...https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g8-science-ministers-statement.


.

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Faculty: Need some time to write this summer?

Poster for the faculty Writing Retreat

Are you working on an article or book chapter this summer? And are you looking for some peace and quiet to make progress?

On July 23-26, 2013, the Library is hosting a free, four-day retreat on campus for University of Guelph faculty working on scholarly writing projects such as books, book chapters, and journal articles. You will be provided with a quiet, comfortable, fully wired space, as well as focused time in which to write.

The retreat will offer an opportunity to build a supportive writing group with colleagues from across the university and to join in group discussions on writing and publishing. For those interested, optional sessions and individual consultations with UofG writing consultants and librarians will be available on writing topics such as writer’s block, organization, and style, and on publishing topics such as copyright and author rights.
 
To participate, you must be working on a specific writing project and be at a stage at which focused writing time makes sense (i.e., finished your research). Participants must also be able to attend all four days of the retreat.

Date: Tuesday to Friday, July 23-26, 2013
 
Time: 8:45am-2pm*
 
Location: McLaughlin Library Room 360
 
*Optional writing time and sessions: 2-4pm daily
 
See registration form below or, for more information, please contact writing@uoguelph.ca.

Thank you!
 
From the Organizing Committee: 

K. Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication
Jodie Salter, Writing Services
Kim Garwood, Writing Services
Lenore Latta, Writing Services
Margaret Hundleby, Writing Services
Pascal Lupien, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication

Please note: Registration will be limited to 15 faculty members on a first-come, first-served basis.

If you are interested in attending, please email writing@uoguelph.ca with the following information by July 12, 2013:

Name:
Extension:   

Email:
Department:

Writing Project (brief description):
 

Open access publishing serves the public good


Image of the CAUT May 2013 President's Column
CAUT May 2013 President's Column
 
The May 2013 CAUT Bulletin includes an article from the president of CAUT, Wayne Peters. In it he writes a strong endorsement of open access: Open access publishing serves the public good.

From the first paragraph:
"Access to the results of academic scholarship and research is in a crisis today due in part to the proliferation of expensive, for-profit, scholarly journals. Most library budgets can no longer maintain extensive collections of periodicals, let alone acquire new ones. Consequently, the realm of accessible knowledge has declined as the work of the academy succumbs to commercial interests."

CAUT's policy on scholarly communications is here. This was first adopted in 2004 and recently re-approved (April 2013).

Read the article: http://www.cautbulletin.ca/en_article.asp?ArticleID=3646

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Posted by K. Jane

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Symbiosis, not parasitism

Times Higher Education logo
Times Higher Education logo
A UK open-access publishing platform would allow the academy to reclaim control of its knowledge and labour, says Steffen Böhm. Steffen Böhm is director of the Essex Sustainability Institute, University of Essex, and professor of management and sustainability at Essex Business School. He hopes that the UK will become  "a beacon of open-access publishing. By cutting out the parasitic publishing middle men, the academy could reclaim control of its knowledge, funding and labour."

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/the-key-to-unlocking-academic-publishing-is-in-our-own-hands-says-steffen-bhm/2004181.article

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posted by K. Jane

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

One week left to nominate a pioneer!

The Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP)  logo
ASAP Logo

Do you know anyone who deserves recognition for being an open access pioneer?


The Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP) recognizes individuals who have used, applied, or remixed scientific research — published through Open Access — to make a difference in science, medicine, business, technology or society as a whole.

  • Three top awards of $30,000 each*
  • A trip to Washington, D.C., to be honored at Open Access Week in October, 2013
  • Inclusion in a portfolio book distributed online and in print around the world

*See the program rules for details on the awards and program requirements, or download the eFlyer.

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posted by K. Jane

Friday, June 7, 2013

Professor Simon Chapman - Social Media and Open Access to increase exposure

 
 
 
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Posted by K. Jane


 To celebrate Open Access Week 2011 the University of Sydney Library hosted a series of presentations by academic colleagues Simon Chapman and others who are harnessing the power of OA to extend their research influence and grow their citation rates.

This video is excellent and worth watching:  http://sydney.edu.au/library/openaccess/

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Springer Open! BiomedCentral! Chemistry Central! Great choices for UG Authors


SpringerOpen publishes 103 peer-reviewed open access journals. University of Guelph is a Member which means you can publish in any BioMed Central journal without paying a fee. The article-processing charge is paid centrally by your institution.




BioMed Central publishes 254 peer-reviewed open access journals. University of Guelph is a Member which means you can publish in any BioMed Central journal without paying a fee. The article-processing charge is paid centrally by your institution.
Your institution also has access to additional products.




Chemistry Central publishes 6 peer-reviewed open access journals. University of Guelph is a Member which means you can publish in any BioMed Central journal without paying a fee. The article-processing charge is paid centrally by your institution.




As a Postpay Member researchers at University of Guelph can publish in any one of BioMed Central, Chemistry Central,  or SpringerOpen journals without incurring any cost or charges. The article processing charge is paid in its entirety by University of Guelph.

What do you know about Gold Open Access?

There are some interesting reads at the Gold Open Access Dialogue blog: http://www.goldoa.org.uk/

The dialogue group includes representatives from all key stakeholder groups, plus relevant domain experts and service providers.  While the work must be international in outlook, it may inevitably have a certain UK bias, especially as the UK is pioneering Gold OA following the Finch Report. 








Current members are:
  • Neil Jacobs (Jisc)
  • Ian Carter (Association of Research Managers and Administrators)
  • Robert Kiley (Wellcome Trust)
  • Mark Thorley (RCUK)
  • Mark Bide (Editeur)
  • Eefke Smit (STM)
  • Audrey McCulloch (ALPSP)
  • Caroline Sutton (Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association)
  • Mike Mertens (Research Libraries UK)
  • Paul Walk (UKOLN)
  • Todd Carpenter (NISO)
  • Anna Clements (EuroCRIS, University of St Andrews)
  • Lars Björnshauge (DOAJ)
  • Ed Pentz (CrossRef)
  • Peter Shepherd (COUNTER)
  • Peter Burnhill (Edina)
  • Rachel Bruce (Jisc)
  • Paul Harwood (Jisc)
  • Nicola Swann (Publishers Association)
  • Graham Taylor (for Publishers Association)
  • Tim Devenport (Editeur)
  • Cameron Neylon (PLoS)

Have you heard of delayed Open Access ?

Delayed Open Access – an overlooked high-impact category of openly available scientific literature

by
Mikael Laakso, Bo-Christer Björk

Abstract: Delayed open access (OA) refers to scholarly articles in subscription journals made available openly on the web directly through the publisher at the expiry of a set embargo period. Though a substantial number of journals have practiced delayed OA since they started publishing e-versions, empirical studies concerning open access have often overlooked this body of literature. This study provides comprehensive quantitative measurements by identifying delayed OA journals, collecting data concerning their
publication volumes, embargo lengths, and citation rates. Altogether 492 journals were identified, publishing a combined total of 111 312 articles in 2011. 77,8 % of these articles were made open access within 12 months from publication, with 85,4 %
becoming available within 24 months. A journal impact factor analysis revealed that delayed OA journals have on average twice as high average citation rates compared to closed subscription journals, and three times as high as immediate OA journals. Overall the results demonstrate that delayed OA journals constitute an important segment of the openly available scholarly journal literature, both by their sheer article.

This is a preprint of an article accepted for publication in Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. Copyright © 2012 (American Society for Information Science and Technology)

 
You can download the article from the open access publishing portal :

 
 
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Posted by K. Jane

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

Easy steps towards open scholarship

Easy steps towards open scholarship

by Ross Mounce

Recently I tried to explain on twitter in a few tweets how everyone can take easy steps towards open scholarship with their own work. It’s really not that hard and potentially very beneficial for your own career progress – open practices enable...



Read the full article at http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/05/24/easy-steps-towards-open-scholarship/




~ Posted by K Jane

EFF says: Don't Believe the Publishers' Hype: Support Open Access

Once again, we are seeing entrenched interests try to fight the future with scare tactics and misinformation. This time, it's major journal publishers, and their target is open access to taxpayer-funded research.

First things first: The reason the publishers are on the warpath is that...


Full article at: Electronic Frontier Foundation

~Posted by K Jane