Thursday, January 31, 2013

In memory of O.P. Dwivedi, Campus Author and professor emeritus in the Department of Political Science


In memory of O.P. Dwivedi, Campus Author and professor emeritus in the Department of Political Science

from the January 31, 2013 - Campus Bulletin: http://www.uoguelph.ca/news/2013/01/flags_to_be_at_51.html 
Campus flags will be lowered to half-mast Feb. 4 in memory of O.P. Dwivedi, professor emeritus in the Department of Political Science, who passed away on Jan. 29.
Dwivedi served as chair of the department from 1979 to 1990. After retiring in 2003, he continued to teach both undergraduate and graduate courses at U of G and served as a Hindu priest on campus. His many honours included being named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a member of the Order of Canada and most recently a recipient of the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal. He also established a school, clinics and an eye hospital in India.
A memorial service will be held in War Memorial Hall on Feb. 3 at 10 a.m. As expressions of sympathy, the family has requested that donations be made to the D.D. Foundation, the foundation the family established in 1993 to support the poor in India.
Donations and condolences can be sent to gilbertmacintyreandson.com.

Dr. O.P. Dwivedi was a celebrated Campus Author. To see his celebrated books go to http://author.lib.uoguelph.ca/viewBooks.cfm and search for his name under all events.

- Posted by K. Jane

Deposit your published articles in the Atrium


Open Access is a mechanism to promote the availability of peer-reviewed scholarly research. As an author you may publish in a peer-reviewed subscription-based journal and then make the article Open Access by depositing a copy of the post-print into an institutional repository such as The Atrium. Most journal publishers allow this. BY adding your articles to the Atrium, you add an additional venue for your research articles, complementing rather than replacing your current publishing practices. This means you expand your readership and will likely  be cited more often.

The majority of publishers follow the GREEN Road to Open Access: they allow the deposit of peer-reviewed research articles into an Open Access repository such as The Atrium. It costs nothing, except a few minutes of time.
Some publishers that allow the published PDF version to be deposited in an institutional repository include:
  • American Meteorological Society
  • American Society of Plant Biologists
  • Anthropological Society of Oxford
  • American Institute of Physics
  • American Mathematical Society
  • Berkeley Electronic Press
  • Biomed Central
  • Cambridge University Press
  • Canadian Psychological Association
  • Chemistry Central
  • Cornell University, The Johnson School
  • Duke University Press
  • Frontiers Research Foundation
  • Hindawi Publishing Corporation
  • Institute of Mathematical Statistics
  • Modern Language Association (upon request)
  • National Institute for Material Science
  • Public Library of Science
  • Springer Open
  • Taylor and Francis Open 
  • University of California Press
 It costs nothing, except a few minutes of time. 

Want to give it a try? To discuss the opportunities, contact one of us at lib.research@uoguelph.ca

- Posted by K. Jane

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Conducting a Patent Search

Join us on Thursday February 28, 2013 between  9:30 AM - 11:30 AM ( 2 hours ) in room 1504 - Science Complex

Michael White, MLIS, B.A., Librarian for Research Services, Queens University  will be conducting a session titled: Conducting a Patent Search

 Search for prior-art is the primary criteria to establish the novelty and non-obviousness of an invention and hence to determine its patentability. Prior-art will include patents related to an invention. In this workshop you’ll learn about the tools and resources available to do a patent search which teaches or otherwise directly related to your invention(s). On-line demonstrations will also be given on some methodologies specific to your technical field. Please bring your laptop for the session. (Charge stations may not be available).

The workshop is planned for graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and faculties.

To register, visit www.uoguelph.ca/tss/registration/.

This workshop forms part of the Guelph IP Academy IP Learning Series—Dialogue and Discussions hosted by the Catalyst Centre in collaboration with the University’s Research Enterprise & Scholarly Communications Team at the Library.

- If you would like to discuss ways that we can support your research, please contact one of the librarians on the Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication Team, Library (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).


- Posted by K. Jane

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Article processing charges reduced to $99 on SAGE Open humanities and social sciences “mega journal”

Louis Jaques. Weekend Magazine. 
Library and Archives Canada, PA-209518

Article processing charges reduced to $99 on SAGE Open humanities and social sciences "mega journal"
<http://wp.me/p20y83-EG>

Back in May of last year Gary F. Daught posted about SAGE Publication's open access multidisciplinary humanities and social sciences "mega journal" called SAGE Open (eISSN 2158-2440). The journal, launched in May 2011, is operated using a producer-side revenue model, where authors (or their sponsors) are charged an article processing fee (APC) once a submitted manuscript has been accepted for publication. The format for SAGE Open is similar to PLOS ONE, the multidisciplinary open access science "mega journal" published by the non-profit open access publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS).

Here is the link to the announcement.

Gary F Daught's post is worth a read. As he puts it, "It appears the space for open access journal publishing for humanities and social science scholars is (at last!) starting to heat up, especially in view of Dr. Martin Paul Eve’s recent proposal that interested parties get together to launch a non-profit PLOS-style mega journal for the humanities and social sciences."

Would you like to talk about Open Access in your discipline? Contact Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication  Librarian  (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).

- Posted by K. Jane

Thursday, January 24, 2013

The Max Planck Society and De Gruyter Sign Agreement for Open Access Publishing

PRESS RELEASE

The Max Planck Society and De Gruyter Sign Agreement for Open Access Publishing

Berlin/Munich, 24 January 2013 – The Max Planck Society (www.mpg.de/en) and the academic publishing house De Gruyter have signed a groundbreaking agreement to cooperate in the publication of Open Access books. The agreement covers texts intended for publication by scholars at the more than 80 individual Max Planck institutes working around the world today. It encompass the full range of disciplines in which the Max Planck Society is active, including the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities, and applies to both monographs and anthologies.

“Our collaboration with De Gruyter will enable us to offer our scholars a unified platform – both from a legal and an organizational perspective – for publishing books in Open Access,” explains Ralf Schimmer, Director of the Department of Scientific Information Provision at the Max Planck Digital Library. “In this way, we’re responding to an increasing number of requests from the Max Planck institutes, and are extending the support we give for Open Access publishing from journal articles to the arena of books.”
De Gruyter is providing the Max Planck Society an attractive opportunity to disseminate its content to the broadest possible audience. Alongside free, global access to content at De Gruyter Online (www.degruyter.com), print versions will also be released.

“Our agreement with the Max Planck Society underscores that De Gruyter’s Open Access model is a groundbreaking form of academic publishing,” says Anke Beck, Vice President of Publishing at De Gruyter. “Publications from the internationally renowned institutes of the Max Planck Society will enrich our program with the highest quality content across all fields of research.”
Already in the past several years De Gruyter has successfully published a number of Open Access books in collaboration with a variety of ongoing research projects, including with the Berlin College of Antiquities’ Cluster of Excellence project The Formation and Transformation of Space and Knowledge in Ancient Civilizations (TOPOI) and with the Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

Contact
Ulrike Lippe
Public Relations Manager
Tel. +49 (0)30-260 05 153
ulrike.lippe@degruyter.com

De Gruyter: The academic publishing house De Gruyter can look back on a history spanning over 260 years. The Berlin-based group of companies releases over 850 new titles each year in the fields of medicine, the humanities, natural sciences, and law, in addition to more than 600 journals and digital media publications. www.degruyter.com

The Max Planck Society: The Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science is an independent, non-profit research organization. It primarily funds research at its own institutions, which conduct basic research in the natural, biological, and social sciences, as well as in the humanities. http://www.mpg.de


- If you would like to discuss the value of Open Access please contact Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication Team, Library (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).


- Posted by K. Jane

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

WIRED: To Make Open Access Work, We Need to Do More Than Liberate Journal Articles

WIRED Opinion:

"To Make Open Access Work, We Need to Do More Than Liberate Journal Articles
By Dan Cohen

In the days since the tragedy of Aaron Swartz’s suicide, many academics have been posting open-access PDFs of their research. It’s an act of solidarity with Swartz’s crusade to liberate (in most cases publicly funded) knowledge for all to read.

While this has been a noteworthy gesture, the problem of open access isn’t just about the ethics of freeing and sharing scholarly information. It’s as much — if not more — about the psychology and incentives around scholarly publishing. We need to think these issues through much more deeply to make open access widespread.

When the phrase academia is best known for is “publish or perish,” it should come as no surprise that ...(read on)


http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/01/we-need-more-than-releasing-articles-to-make-open-access-work/


  Post your research online, free and use the hashtag #PDFTribute, to honor Aaron Swartz

- If you would like to discuss the value of Open Access please contact Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication Team, Library (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).


- Jane

Monday, January 21, 2013

Monday morning reading

The brave new world of open access. Drug and Alcohol Review, McKetin, R. (2013), 32: 1–2. doi: 10.1111/dar.12021
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/dar.12021/abstract

Hiding your research behind a paywall is immoral
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2013/jan/17/open-access-publishing-science-paywall-immoral

Open Access: Principles and Practice for Learned Societies
http://blog.alpsp.org/2013/01/open-access-principles-and-practice-for.html
What are the guiding principles and practical actions a learned society should consider when it approaches open access models?

UNESCO releases Vancouver Declaration on Digitization and Preservation
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/media-services/single-view/news/unesco_releases_vancouver_declaration_on_digitization_and_preservation/back/18256/
UNESCO/UBC Vancouver Declaration ( PDF )

Tribute to Aaron Swartz: Watch his "How we stopped SOPA" keynote at F2C2012
<http://oaopenaccess.wordpress.com/2013/01/20/tribute-to-aaron-swartz-watch-his-how-we-stopped-sopa-keynote-at-f2c2012/>

- If you would like to discuss the value of Open Access please contact Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication Team, Library (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).

- Jane

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Research is more valuable when it's shared


Sharing enables new research to build on earlier findings. It not only fuels the further advancement of knowledge, it brings scientists and scholars the recognition that advances their careers. In the digital world, the ways we share and use scholarly material are expanding — rapidly, fundamentally, irreversibly.

 READ at More SPARC Resources for Authors.


Check out this week's Articles of Interest compiled by SPARC:

- If you would like to discuss the value of Open Access please contact Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication Team, Library (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).

- Jane

Monday, January 14, 2013

Cut Copy Paste - #pdftribute


The internet activist Aaron Swartz, seen here in January 2009, has died at the age of 26. Photograph: Michael Francis Mcelroy/AP photo grabbed from the  Guardian Website: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/12/aaron-swartz-heroism-suicide1
Aaron Swartz was a 26 year-old internet activist who downloaded millions of JSTOR articles and made them public. He was aggressively pursued by federal prosecutors, who, under no pressure from JSTOR, sought million-dollar fines and decades in prison. 

On Friday, he took his own life.

In tribute to Aaron, academics worldwide are now posting paywall-controlled articles online for free through Twitter with the hashtag #pdftribute (https://twitter.com/search/realtime?q=%23pdftribute&src=hash).

Article/commentary on the situation: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jan/12/aaron-swartz-heroism-suicide1
Full list of pdfs tweeted so far: http://pdftribute.net/

Remember, RESC librarians can help you free your work. We are on your side, more than you know. Let us help you deposit copies of your published work in the Libraries'  Institutional Repository, The Atrium.

Contact one of us at lib.research@uoguelph.ca  

Peace,
- Jane Burpee

Thursday, January 10, 2013

Open Access in the Arts?

If you are at all interested in the state of open access in the arts, I recommend that you watch the following vimeo presentation:


A Matter of Discipline: The State of Open Access in the Arts
from ARLIS/NA

Providing a survey of open access publishing in the arts, Patrick Tomlin will give us an overview of the two dominant "flavors" of open publishing, the open access journal and the institutional or disciplinary repository, examining successful examples of both in disciplines like art history, architecture and design. We will look at what obstacles are slowing the uptake of open access publishing by scholars in the arts, and what possible roles the art librarian might play in raising awareness of open access and other pressing scholarly communication issues.

Speaker:
Patrick Tomlin, Head of the Art + Architecture Library, Virginia Tech

*This is an encore presentation of Patrick's ARLIS/NA 2010 Boston conference presentation.

- If you would like to discuss the value of Open Access in your discipline please contact Jane Burpee, Research Enterprise and Scholarly Communication Team, Library (lib.research@uoguelph.ca).